on the topic of

3: How can I deepen my truth-facing and truth-telling?


[breadcrumbs]

Summary of Spiral Journey Topic/Dimension/Challenge 3

How can I/we find compassionate and emotionally sustainable ways of facing the truth, telling the truth, living with the truth, and living for the truth? How will I/we confront the lies of our time, and the elements of self-deception, oppression and destruction in ourselves and in our own culture?


rainbow-star2

Invitation to Contribute

Resources for the Great Turning invites you to suggest content for this page by using the form on the right. On some pages there may not be any resources listed yet. Whether this page has many entries or none, please use the suggestion form on the right to recommend $$zzwhattypezz$$ %%zzthathavezz$$ facing the truth more courageously and telling the truth more compassionately.



We interrupt our usual info providing
to bring you this special public health alert:
A song and posters for a time of pandemic and crisis:


Gretchen’s gift to a world in crisis: an inspiring song, placed in the Creative Commons for all to enjoy, sing, and pass on to others. You can hear and learn each of the harmony parts at https://songsforthegreatturning.net/honoring-our-pain-for-the-world/may-this-be-an-opening/
The music and lyrics are copyable, adaptable, and shareable, under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Many thanks to Ajith Samuel for the Creative Commons video of the opening flower. Video production by Dennis Rivers.

 


June 2020: Experiencing the murderous violence of America’s broken promises:

Image from news report in Guardian.com newspaper

 

George Floyd Memorial Poster  (click to download)

 




From Vox.com  By David Roberts – Oct 21, 2020

Geothermal power is the perpetual also-ran of renewable energy, chugging along in the background for decades, never quite breaking out of its little niche, forever causing energy experts to say, “Oh, yeah, geothermal … what’s up with that?”

Well, after approximately 15 years of reporting on energy, I finally took the time to do a deep dive into geothermal and I am here to report: This is a great time to start paying attention!
  


After many years of failure to launch, new companies and technologies have brought geothermal out of its doldrums, to the point that it may finally be ready to scale up and become a major player in clean energy. In fact, if its more enthusiastic backers are correct, geothermal may hold the key to making 100 percent clean electricity available to everyone in the world. And as a bonus, it’s an opportunity for the struggling oil and gas industry to put its capital and skills to work on something that won’t degrade the planet.

Vik Rao, former chief technology officer at Halliburton, the oil field service giant, recently told the geothermal blog Heat Beat, “geothermal is no longer a niche play. It’s scalable, potentially in a highly material way. Scalability gets the attention of the [oil services] industry.”

In this post, I’m going to cover technologies meant to mine heat deep from the Earth, which can then be used as direct heat for communities, to generate electricity, or to do both through “cogeneration” of heat and electricity. (Note that ground-source heat pumps, which take advantage of steady shallow-earth temperatures to heat buildings or groups of buildings, are sometimes included among geothermal technologies, but I’m going to leave them aside for a separate post.)

Before we get to the technologies, though, let’s take a quick look at geothermal energy itself.

Read more…





Winter temperatures in Alliance, Nebraska can drop to -20°F (the record low is -40°F/C), but retired mailman Russ Finch grows oranges in his backyard greenhouse without paying for heat. Instead, he draws on the earth’s stable temperature (around 52 degrees in his region) to grow warm weather produce- citrus, figs, pomegranates – in the snow.

Finch first discovered geothermal heating in 1979 when he and his wife built it into their 4400-square-foot dream home to cut energy costs. Eighteen years later they decided to add a 16’x80′ greenhouse in the backyard. The greenhouse resembles a pit greenhouse (walipini) in that the floor is dug down 4 feet below the surface and the roof is slanted to catch the southern sun.

To avoid using heaters for the cold Nebraska winter nights, Finch relies on the warm underground air fed into the greenhouse via plastic tubing under the yard and one fan. Finch sells a “Citrus in the Snow” report detailing his work with his “geo-air” greenhouses and says anyone can build a market-producing greenhouse for about $25,000 or “less than the cost of a heat system on a traditional greenhouse”. https://greenhouseinthesnow.com/